ONL172 has come to an end, but the adventure continues

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CC0 Public domain by Sebastian Voortman on Pexels

We hope you have enjoyed the ONL experience and have discovered new ideas, methods and tools that you can use in your own teaching and learning. We also hope you have expanded your professional network and that some of you will continue to collaborate in the future. The aim of ONL is to introduce you to the world of open networked learning but the real work starts afterwards as you begin to explore the themes and concepts in more detail.

Many of you are still busy finishing your final blog posts. When you’re finished please remember to complete the Activity Tracker. Once we see that you have completed the course we will review your work and you will receive course certificates over the coming weeks. Those who belong to one of the participating institutions will get a certificate from your institution whilst open learners will get an open learner certificate.

ONL will take a break for the first time since we started back in 2014 and there will be no course in the first half of 2018. Instead we will return in September 2018 with ONL181. Very soon we will add a page with more information about ONL181.

Good luck and please keep in touch!

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Topic 5 – Lessons learnt and future practice

Our journey is coming to an end as we enter the final week of ONL172 (see the full description of topic 5). However you can also see this as the end of the beginning and the start of a longer journey as you find new opportunities to widen the scope of your teaching and learning. We hope you have found what you were looking for when you signed up for this course and that you will take this with you into your future work. We also sincerely hope that you have had good fun on the way! We know for sure you have put in lots of work into the course work – a quick glance at the groups’ presentations for the different topics will tell you that! Well done, all!

This week, the concluding week, the idea is that we try to put it all together – digital literacies, openness, sharing, networking, collaboration, course design – and reflect on what really happened in the course and how you will apply these insights into your own practice. Is it really an option to fall back to old ways of working or will we be looking for new and more updated ways to meet future demands? That is, of course, all up to you.

You will have an opportunity to reflect on this in your PBL group as well as in the final webinar (1 December).

If you are aiming for a certificate (check participation modes and requirements) you should have written at least four blog posts by now and use this week to write a final, summarizing post. If you are part of a PBL-group, this week is for reflecting on the group’s achievements and sharing a final presentation in the ONL G+ community.

Wish you all the best for future collaborations!
The ONL team

Topic 2 week 2

We hope you are enjoying exploring the world of open education. It’s a fascinating world and far from simple, as we are sure you have already discovered.

This week you are invited to take part in another ONL tweetchat. Kay Oddone and Alastair Creelman will be hosting this on Wednesday, 25 October at 12.00 CEST and we’ll be chatting about open education and following up on some of the themes discussed in last week’s webinar as well as the fantastic discussion on the Topic 2 Padlet page. We will collect all the material from this topic on that Padlet page so you’ll find all the resources there. Please continue to contribute to the discussion there!

We would also like to remind you of the activity tracker and to start planning your topic 2 blog posts.

Enjoy the week!

Topic 2: Open learning – Sharing and openness

Just when you’re polishing off Topic 1 along comes Topic 2, starting on Monday 16 October!

We hope you are now getting familiar with the course set-up and have enjoyed working in your PBL groups on the first topic.

Now we move on to a central element in this course; the topic of openness. Education has mostly been run in relatively closed environments like classrooms, lecture halls and learning management systems. Today however, education is opening up. Teachers are sharing their resources, institutions are making their course material publicly available and even offering courses for free as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC).

This topic starts by asking you to watch an introduction film by Kay Oddone and Alastair Creelman and then add your comments and questions on a common workspace called Padlet. Go to the full topic description page for all instructions and links.

Have you started your learning blog yet? If you haven’t please look at our guide and get started as soon as you can. We would also like to remind you to keep up to date with your own reflective blog posts and update your progress in the activity tracker.

Read the full description of Topic 2.

ONL172 starts 25 September

The next iteration of Open Networked Learning, ONL172, starts very soon, 25 September, and will continue till 1 December. Please check the course overview for the general outline. You are also welcome to follow our hashtag #ONL172 on Twitter for updates..

See course overview.
Registration details.

If you work at one of the organising institutions you can register for the course already via the following links: Karolinska Institute, Lund University, Linnaeus University, Stockholm University,  Luleå University of Technology, Arcada University of Applied Sciences (Helsinki) and Independent Institute of Education (South Africa).

If you do not belong to these institutions you are welcome to join the course as an open learner (registration form).

We look forward to meeting you all very soon!

Topic 2 week 2

We hope you are enjoying your investigation of openness in education. It is a complex topic and could easily fill a whole course. If you want to dig a bit deeper into the issues involved here we can recommend that you read Martin Weller’s book The battle for open. The book is free to read online and gives a balanced analysis of the many faces of “open”. If you don’t have time to read it just now you can always bookmark it and return later.

If you missed last week’s webinar with Teresa MacKinnon you can watch the recording. This week we will discuss aspects of openness in a tweetchat (a chat session on Twitter), Wednesday 15 March, 19.00 – 20.00 (Swedish time, CET). If you haven’t tried a tweetchat before there are films to show you what to do on the event page.

Keep the blog posts coming and remember that if you want to see the latest posts from the community have a look at the blog roll.

Topic 2: Open Learning – sharing and openness

We hope you are now getting familiar with the course set-up and have enjoyed working in your PBL groups on the first topic.

Now we move on to a central element in this course; the topic of openness. Education has mostly been run in relatively closed environments like classrooms, lecture halls and learning management systems. Today however education is opening up. Teachers are sharing their resources, institutions are making their course material publicly available and even offering them for free.

Most of you have now started writing your blogs and there have been some very impressive efforts so far. One way of keeping track of the latest posts is by checking our ONL171 Blog Roll regularly. Here you’ll see the latest posts from all members of ONL171, just scroll down to see more. Dip in now and again and comment on posts you find interesting! If you can’t find your latest post here, contact your facilitator.

We would also like to remind you to keep up to date with your own reflective blog posts and update your progress in the activity tracker.

Read the full description of Topic 2.

ONL171 starts 13 February

The next iteration of Open Networked Learning, ONL171, starts very soon, 13 February. There is still time for open learners to register (register as an open learner). If you work at one of the organising institutions please check your institution’s own registration form: Karolinska Institute, Lund University, Linnaeus University and Independent Institute of Education.

We look forward to meeting you in February!

Open learning – week 2

photo-1454942901704-3c44c11b2ad1-1Now we start the second week of Topic 2 on opening up education. We hope you are enjoying investigating this fascinating and rapidly developing field and have found time to sample the recommended reading and viewing as a stimulus to your group work.

If you haven’t already done so have a look at the Padlet wall about open education that many of you contributed to last week. It is full of interesting ideas, opinions, links and even discussions and you are welcome to add to the collection – just scroll and find an open space to click on and write your ideas!

We’re looking forward to seeing the results of your work next week in the main community. Don’t forget to check the blog roll regularly to see what your colleagues are writing about and please comment on some of them. It’s always nice to connect!

Photo: CC0 Public domain by Joshua Earle on Unsplash

Topic 2: Open learning – sharing and openness

We hope you are now getting familiar with the course set-up and have enjoyed working in your PBL groups on the first topic.

Now we move on to a central element in this course; the topic of openness. Education has mostly been run in relatively closed environments like classrooms, lecture halls and learning management systems. Today however education is opening up. Teachers are sharing their resources, institutions are making their course material publicly available and even offering them for free.

By the end of this topic, you will have had the opportunity to

  • discuss open resources, open/closed tools and open participation courses
  • reflect on different aspects of openness in your own context
  • review in groups open features of the chosen activity/resource
  • inquire into open educational practices related to a specific scenario

We would also like to remind you to keep up to date with your own reflective blog posts and update your progress in the activity tracker.

Read the full description of Topic 2.